Gallery

The Protea family (Proteaceae) has always attracted attention. The first known specimen was described by Carolus Clusius, a Flemish Botanist, who in 1597 described the Oleander-leaf Protea (Protea neriifolia) as “an elegant thistle”. It was mistakenly assumed to come from the north-eastern coast of Madagascar, however, today we know that this specimen originated from the Cape Region. Many Cape Proteaceae have now been carefully described; the species number stands around 330.

The fact that Cape Proteaceae are well-studied, both taxonomically and ecologically, has stimulated much local and international research interest and collaboration. From an ecological perspective, we are fascinated by the ability of these plants to persist on remote mountain peaks, to re-establish new seedlings after seemingly catastrophic fires and their ability to persist in nutrient poor environments – often scorched by summer heat and seasonal drought.

Below are a few of my study species (Proteaceae; including Protea and Leucadendron). *Why not also take a look on ISpot (a free online community for sharing nature)? Website here.

Protea compacta (Botriver Protea)

Protea compacta (Botriver Protea)

Protea speciosa (Brown-bearded Sugarbush)

Protea speciosa (Brown-bearded Sugarbush)

Protea cynaroides (King Protea)

Protea cynaroides (King Protea)

Protea eximia (Borad-leaf Sugarbush)

Protea eximia (Broad-leaf Sugarbush)

Protea neriifolia (Oleander-leaf Sugarbush)

Protea neriifolia (Oleander-leaf Sugarbush)

Leucadendron album (Linear-leaf Conebush; female and male plants)

Leucadendron album (Linear-leaf Conebush; female- and male plants)

Leucadendron spissifolium (Common Spearleaf Conebush; female plant bearing cones)

Leucadendron spissifolium (Common Spearleaf Conebush; female plant)

Leucadendron muirii (Silverball Conebush)

Leucadendron muirii (Silverball Conebush; female plant)

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